Lincoln Dinners - Hagerman-Gooding, Idaho




My name is Lawrence Wasden, and I'm the Attorney General. I've spent a lot of time I down here in Hagerman shooting Ducks on the firing line. My wife lived in Gooding the day I met her. So Gooding and Hagerman are important places to me.


My wife, Tracey is here somewhere.


We've heard a lot tonight about sovereignty. I want to talk about that for a moment, too, because some people have said, hey, we should have joined that Texas case. Well, I have a question for you. How many of you believe that the state of California should control Idaho? Can you do stand up, I'd like to see you?


How about your people down there? Okay. They're all bending down. Nobody here believes that California should control Idaho. But guess what?


That's what the Texas versus Pennsylvania case was about. It was not a state suing the federal government. It was one state suing another state about that state's exercise of its sovereign power over its elections. If Texas can sue Pennsylvania, then California can sue us.


So who is it who stood up for the sovereignty of Idaho?


It was me alone when no one else would.


Now, we've heard a lot about Conservatives, and folks have said, hey, I'm going to be the conservative Attorney General. But when you stand on the State House steps and you take an oath to uphold the United States Constitution, the Constitution of the State of Idaho and to do your duty, which is the law, you're not promising to represent Conservatives or moderates or Liberals or Democrats or Republicans or Libertarians. The only "oans" that you represent are Idahoans, and you don't represent them as individuals. You represent them collectively. How do you defend their rights it's because of how you interact with those who you give advice to and those you go to court for.


That's the two things that you do as attorney general.


The statutes aren't always as clearly written as people would like you to believe. And the fact of the matter is, when I'm called upon to give advice to the governor, the law requires me to give him that advice. Not my personal view, not my policy view, not what I think should happen, but what the law says can happen. You don't want to have an attorney general who's going to impose his own personal view. You need to have someone who will tell people what they need to hear rather than what they want to hear.


I ask for your vote in May. Thank you very much.